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All About Furisode-San

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All About Furisode-San

Post  AnaIkimaru on Sun Aug 23, 2009 8:43 am

blank post- will finish tomorrow *points to the time*
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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:30 am

Ok hear is every thing I could fined on line regarding Furisode-san.

IG
There is also a group of women in the Asakusa district who go by the name of "Furisode-san", who appear to mimic the look and feel of Maiko. It appears that the Furisode-san were created to help revive some of the older districts. Whether they can be called real Geisha or not, is debatable. To become a furisode-san, women have to be between the ages of 18-25 and undergo a training period of three months to learn basic dance and tea ceremony, along with correct application of the make-up and kimono dressing.

Mboogiedown
It is important to know that FURISODESAN ARE NOT GEISHA. Furisode means "long sleeves," a reference to the women's long kimono sleeves that indicate they are young and unmarried. Their three-month instruction covers basic dance, makeup, kimono, and tea ceremony, through which they learn manners and acquire the veneer of geisha. But it is a thin veneer indeed if you consider the years of hard-core training that apprentices go through before becoming full-fledged geisha. Even at that point, a geisha's training never ends. Their entire lives are dedicated to mastering their arts.

Furisode-san are very popular among customers because their entertainment is accessible to noraml, everday people at a lower cost. It is popular among young women because of the good salary and easy training period.

factsanddetails.com
Quasi and Fake Geishas
Many women that pass as geishas are not real geishas, but geishas wannabes known as furisode-san, who are hired to sit like mannequins in the lobbies of hotels and pose for photographs at weddings, tourist sights and New Year's parties. "Furisode" is the name of kimono they wear which have sleeves that hang down to their ankles.
Furisode-san dress up like geishas, have white make up and provide entertain men at fancy restaurants like geishas but don’t have the training, fine clothes, hairdos or the studied elegance of geishas and cost less. They are associated with sakusa district of Tokyo
The majority of furisode-san are girls, in their late teens and early twenties, who attend a three-month crash course that teaches them to act like geishas and dance to taped music. They generally earn a salary of 250,000 yen a month
.

Unknown website

Furisode-san is a nick-name for a new breed of geisha. Geisha and maiko numbers in Japan have been falling for many years, especially after the economic depression hit. However a group of shopkeeper's wives in Tokyo's Asakusa district have formed an organisation - Furisode Gakuin - to create a type of geisha for the 21st century.
The nick-name refers to the fact that they wear furisode kimono, in contrast to the short-sleeved kimono geisha wear. They are also much more brightly coloured and decorative. Girls between the ages of 18 and 25 can apply to be educated in the arts of traditional dance and the tea ceremony, though their training last months, rather than years.
Rather than have to find a wealthy patron like geisha, furisode-san's costs are paid for by Furisode Gakuin. As the training is shorter than in say Kyoto, costs are lower for the company and therefore customers. They receive a fixed salary, rather than commissions. They can also be hired by almost anyone, at cheaper rates than their more exclusive counterparts.
Furisode Gakuin has received a vast number of applications since it was set up, with young women from all over Japan showing their interest. The good salary is an attractive way of making money. They are also attracting many customers, and although some older men complain that they are not as refined as the Kyoto geisha and maiko, their accessibility wins almost everyone over. Parents are also reassured by the corporate structure of Furisode Gakuin.
"My parents were surprised at first, but now when they know that I'll be performing somewhere they bring a camera and take lots of pictures," said Urara, 22, a furisode-san of two years.
The "geisha-lite" will undoubtably save the profession from extinction. Just as Japan has survived in the past by adapting to new situations, reforming geisha practices and training will help this traditional entertainment continue.

More coming soon............

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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:31 am

thestar.com
Asakusa's 21st-century geisha
By MIHO IKEYA
TOKYO: Young women in white makeup and clad in gorgeous kimono walk gracefully through the Nakamise shopping walkway leading to Sensoji temple in Asakusa, Taito Ward, Tokyo.
Are they maiko entertainers? No, these are so-called furisode-san — a new type of entertainer named after the type of long-sleeved kimono they wear — and they are full-time employees of a company in Asakusa that has come up with a new way of doing business.
At a super sento, a major public bath with deluxe facilities, near the famed Asakusa Engei Hall, about 30 men were gathered in a banquet hall, lying back and stretching out their legs in a relaxed atmosphere. But they looked mellow not because of the glasses of beer they were enjoying after their baths. By following their gaze, it turned out that three furisode-san dancing to the elegant sounds of a shamisen were holding their attention.
The entertainers moved like butterflies, the long sleeves of their kimono gently fluttering.
Kanzashi hair ornaments in their Japanese-style hairdos swung as they moved. A whiff of face powder hung in the air. Innocent smiles played across their faces.
One elderly man seated in the front row was in a good mood.
“Oh, yes. I couldn't be happier, having all these pretty girls dancing and serving me sake,” he said.
Furisode-san come to the public bathhouse every Thursday and Friday night, creating a festive atmosphere, according to the facility's operators.
The entertainers belong to Asakusa Kanko Furisode Gakuin in Taito Ward, a firm jointly funded by Tobu Railway Co, Hanayashiki Co, and other businesses in the area. Actor Koji Ishizaka is the firm's director, while the wives of shopkeepers in the Asakusa serve as board members.
Under the slogan, “Maiko-han in Kyoto and furisode-san in Asakusa,” Asakusa Okami-san Kai, or the association of Asakusa shopkeepers’ wives, set up the company in 1994.
The company’s 13 furisode-san are all fulltime workers paid 250,000 yen monthly and a twice-yearly bonus. The company also pays for their kimono, dance lessons and other necessary expenses.
In order to help customers remember their names, they use business cards instead of the senjafuda votive cards traditionally used by maiko.
Although there are conventional geisha in Asakusa, they are paid by the job and consequently have an uncertain income. Moreover, they have to buy their own kimono and cover their own expenses. The furisode-san company was founded on the assumption that young women would not want to become geisha or maiko in such circumstances.
Hiring one of the furisode-san costs 25,200 yen (RM756) for two hours for a party in Asakusa, and the entertainers are in great demand for the area's drinking parties.
Twenty-one year old Shishimaru joined this world after resigning from a clerical job.
“I'm pleased to see customers' faces light up after we arrive. It makes me happy as I'm doing what I want to do,” she said with satisfaction.
But few women look good in furisode beyond their mid-20s, and so many of these entertainers retire from the job at around that age, disappearing with the suddenness of cherry blossom falling from a tree.

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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:50 am

GLOBE AND MAIL
Tuesday, December 19, 2000
Masako Iijima
Reuters News Agency



The gentle art of the geisha, revisited
An enterprising group of women in Tokyo is reviving the memory of the kimono-clad entertainers — albeit in an altered form
TOKYO — Twice a week, young women come to a dance studio to learn the steps to classical Japanese dances, a must in the work of a geisha.
Had they undergone training three or four decades ago, they would have had a wealthy patron to pay for lessons and buy them their colourful kimonos. But times have changed and the customary role of geisha as female entertainers hired for an evening of song, dance and sometimes bed is no longer in high demand.
In fact, geisha are on the brink of extinction.
To bring back the memory of the kimono-clad entertainers, an enterprising group of women — all wives of shopkeepers in Tokyo's famed Asakusa district — started a business six years ago to revive the trade, albeit in an altered form.
The company, Furisode Gakuin, is at once a school and a business. Young women interested in becoming modern-day geisha send in résumés from all over the country and, if accepted, begin schooling in the art of dance and the tea ceremony.
They are called furisode-san for the kimono they wear with sleeves reaching down to the ankles. The bright silk garment is worn with a thick brocade belt, and only unmarried women have the social privilege of donning this attire.
"Actual geisha need a wealthy patron to support them … but in the case of furisode-san the company bears the training costs," said Risa Kawai, manager at Furisode Gakuin. "The girls work for a fixed salary, not for commissions."
The 12 furisode-san now employed at the firm are between 18 and 25 and can be hired for $325 an hour to entertain anywhere. Prostitution, outlawed in 1958, is of course not part of their work, but furisode-san can be hired to hand out fliers on the streets or attend ribbon-cutting ceremonies.
Historical documents show geisha appeared in Edo, as Tokyo was called, in the early 17th century. At one time, Edo red-light districts were home to 2,500 prostitutes and geisha. During the feudal era, defined by rigid social classes, and even as recently as a few decades after the end of the Second World War, those women who became geisha had little choice but to rely on their good looks to support themselves.
Now there are no traces of geisha houses that once dotted entertainment districts like Yoshiwara. The few geisha in Tokyo are mostly elderly, but tradition still commands a high price for them; an evening meal and entertainment with one could cost well over $1,500.
"We see furisode-san as something entirely different from geisha," said a member of a shopping-mall association that hires furisode-san to hand out discount coupons at annual sales events. "They are young and very pretty and they attract crowds because people like to get their photographs taken with them."
Contrary to popular belief, not all geisha in the past were prostitutes. Many were professional dancers, singers or musicians, as well as trained conversationalists.
Modern furisode-san are not geisha, but Furisode Gakuin tries to instill some aspects of geishahood in its students. Retired geisha teach them how to put on kimonos, paint their faces and wear wigs made up in traditional hairstyles.
Women seeking a job at Furisode Gakuin do so for a wide range of reasons, from something as frivolous as wanting to wear expensive kimonos to a desire to delve into Japanese culture.
But the art of interacting with customers is learned through on-the-job training. "There is no manual on how to interact with customers. … You have to assess the personality of each customer and steer the conversation in a way that he would enjoy," said Aya, 23, who joined this spring. "It's not as easy as it seems."
Geisha normally carry a social stigma, but because of the corporate structure of Furisode Gakuin the women meet with little opposition from their parents when they join.
"My parents were surprised at first, but now when they know that I'll be performing somewhere they bring a camera and take lots of pictures," said Urara, 22, a furisode-san of two years.
The hard work seems to have paid off and furisode-san have become so popular that their appointment books fill up weeks in advance.
"The old system made it difficult for ordinary people to have access to geisha and now the trade is dying," said Kawai. "The only way to breathe new life into it is to create an environment where young women will want to carry on the tradition and ordinary people are able to afford their company."

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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:58 am

Web sites that have more info
www.furisodesan.com (I did try to translate this one with babalfish but it no good the English is unintelligible .)

www.immortalgeisha.com

tsurukomaiko.freeforums.org

kimonosan.freeforums.org
Books that have more info
Geisha
by Liza Dalby (I haven't read this in a wile but I think she talks about them briefly )

Geisha: The Secret History of a Vanishing World
by Lesley Downer

Geisha: A Unique World of Tradition, Elegance and Art
by John Gallagher

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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  AnaIkimaru on Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:46 am

Thank you very much for posting this Dr.B- It's a great help. I've been trying to get caught up around here but the wedding and the holidays leave me a little distracted santa

If neither of us haven't posted it yet- please do post a link to your Kimono-san forum.
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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:35 am

AnaIkimaru wrote:Thank you very much for posting this Dr.B- It's a great help. I've been trying to get caught up around here but the wedding and the holidays leave me a little distracted santa

If neither of us haven't posted it yet- please do post a link to your Kimono-san forum.
you already posted the forum link

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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  AnaIkimaru on Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:48 pm

I *thought* I did- pardon the dust around here I'm trying to get caught up with the forum lol.

I'm going to post a debate thread in the forum...be very curious for your input.
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Re: All About Furisode-San

Post  Dr.B aka Matsuko on Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:18 am

A debate on what? K-san and F-san?

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